I was around when the “Lovebug” virus hit the industry, and that was a wake up call to the industry to take on better protection, anti-virus protection and also awareness.  It seems now, years later, with Ransomware being creative to encrypt and hold your machine hostage, that another wakeup call has appeared with WannaCry.  If anything, this goes to show more attention needed on keeping your OS up to date, patches, and also continue the trend of education to the users against Phishing.    While the industry is focused on protection, response and education, we also have to educate the public as this is the start of the spread for so many cases.  So, this article below is is the wake-up call for awareness which is one good start.   Have a good read from SC Media.

https://www.scmagazine.com/wannacrys-silver-lining-greater-public-awareness-for-ransomware/article/664533/

 

 

Continuing my series in Change and Release Management, I thought I would do an update on some topics around Enterprise Change Management.

20170330_161619I recently had the opportunity to give a lecture at the University of Economics, in Prague, Czech Republic in April 2017 on Automation Design & Test, and in discussion, we talked about DevOps, frequency of change and ITIL Change Management concepts.  We focused on Design and Automation patterns for Test and how to plan for Automation and Test in DevOps using Continuous Integration.   But with DevOps, the goal is to be able to iterate release activity and be able to deploy changes much faster than waterfall.  And how do you do that when there is time and process to work through with the Change Management process?   Read the rest of this entry »

Continuing my series on Release Management, I thought I would write an article with regard to larger Systems Implementation and Planning. Many times, especially with DevOps we speak about smaller systems, web applications, or even mobility apps. 512px-ComputernetworkHowever, there are still quite a few large, complex systems that undertake a release activity that may require much more activity and planning.  In Release Management, we call this out in the Release Planning phase with respect to the change scope making up a Release.  Changes are scoped to a Release.  The change scope specifically then determines the impact of how complex the release will be. The Release determines the environment needs as well as what the environments or systems will need a regression test.  That activity does not change even with the smaller releases.  The difference is larger IT releases in the amount of systems needed.   However, for larger IT systems there are a few things in play here. Read the rest of this entry »

Nascar Racing at Dover DEContinuing my series on Release Management, I would like to discuss the Build and Deployment Team as well as the Deployment Activity in Software Release Management.  Now you are probably wondering, what the heck does that have to do with a picture of a Nascar Race Track shown on the left?  Well, I have been around race cars and car racing since a teen, and worked on several local race teams helping friends compete in local Nascar events for many years, and I still admire and attend the Nascar races each year.  And knowing the way this sport operates, or any team sport for that matter, I think the analogy of the sport of racing is a good one to use with regard to resourcing build and deployment teams. Read the rest of this entry »

William_M_PragueWhile I have written much about Configuration Management and Change Management on my site here, I recognized that I need to have a few articles on Release Management. Therefore, this series will discuss Release Planning, Enterprise Release Management and how that applies to DevOps and Waterfall.

Read the rest of this entry »

A very good article on the use of JSON in a VagrantFile. Thanks to Gary for posting this! It is a great example of multiple machine provisions with Chef and the use of Vagrant. 

Programmatic Ponderings

Create and manage ‘multi-machine’ environments with Vagrant, using JSON configuration files. Allow increased portability across hosts, environments, and organizations. 

Diagram of VM Architecture3

Introduction

As their website says, Vagrant has made it very easy to ‘create and configure lightweight, reproducible, and portable development environments.’ Based on Ruby, the elegantly simple open-source programming language, Vagrant requires a minimal learning curve to get up and running.

In this post, we will create what Vagrant refers to as a ‘multi-machine’ environment. We will provision three virtual machines (VMs). The VMs will mirror a typical three-tier architected environment, with separate web, application, and database servers.

We will move all the VM-specific information from the Vagrantfile to a separate JSON format configuration file. There are a few advantages to moving the configuration information to separate file. First, we can configure any number VMs, while keeping the Vagrantfile exactly the same. Secondly and more importantly, we can re-use the same Vagrantfile to build…

View original post 476 more words

wiki-software-developI have been doing Build and Release Management for the last 10 years, and I often see questions or posts on the future of Build and Release Management.  What’s next for those doing Build and Release Management?    That’s a question we keep seeing.   Read the rest of this entry »